My Cancer Journey Update
– And Newest Protocol –
 

Dr. Al Danenberg Nutritional Periodontist

April 17, 2022

 

Much has changed, and it’s time to share the latest update from my cancer journey. It’s been a wild ride, and I appreciate all your support along the way. It means the world to me.

There have been some recent developments I’d like to share with you, and they’ve led to an addition to my 11 Unconventional Cancer Protocols, as you’ll read at the end of this Blog.

My newest protocol will come as a surprise. It did to me too! But hey, I don’t call my protocols “unconventional” for no reason!

Let’s start with a recap, beginning in June of 2021.

 

Recap from June 2021

I had a reemergence of multiple myeloma because the severe side effects from an immunotherapy injection on June 22, 2021. The side effects weakened my body and made me susceptible to the COVID virus. By the end of July 2021, I knew I had contracted COVID-19.

At that time, I discontinued the monthly immunotherapy injections, and began to recover from the COVID acute symptoms. My recovery was the result of my efforts to enhance my immune system via my Unconventional Cancer Protocols, which I started when I was diagnosed with incurable bone marrow cancer in 2018.

During my recovery time, my oncologist thought that my symptoms were predominately the effects of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. So, I returned to the immunotherapy treatment on January 4, 2022, thinking it might still be effective for me. After that treatment, I received another injection on 2/1/22.

My oncologist and I were wrong! The reintroduction of the immunotherapy proved to be critically damaging for me.

After the immunotherapy treatment on 2/1/22, the intense side effects returned with a vengeance. Several weeks after the injection, I began to develop piercing sciatic pain in my left leg, sharp pain in my joints, and significant discomfort and weakness throughout my body. My oncologist scheduled me for a new PET Scan.

 

PET Scan Results: 2/28/22

The newest PET Scan on 2/28/22 showed a reemergence of multiple myeloma cells …

  • An accumulation of malignant plasma cells near my left eye orbit.
  • An accumulation of cancer cells in my sacral area affecting the sciatic nerve and other structures.

To determine the extent of the eye lesion, I had a Brain MRI on 3/10/22. The MRI showed a soft tissue mass approximately 2cm X 1cm X 1cm. It was invading an area around a posterior eye muscle of my left eye. But I didn’t have any symptoms, yet.

My oncologist scheduled me to see a radiation oncologist to evaluate the lesion near my left eye and the malignant plasma cells in the sacrum area. My leg pain was continuous and stabbing. It was not controllable even with narcotics.

In addition, my legs also were developing extensive edema. In just 6 weeks, I put on about 12 pounds of fluid weight. My oncologist thought there might be a blood clot, so he scheduled an ultrasound of my legs, which turned out to be negative. He then set up an appointment with a vascular surgeon to evaluate the acute leg edema.

 

Radiation Oncologist: 3/22/22

I didn’t want to go blind in my left eye, and I needed the pain in my legs to end. So, on 3/22/22, I saw the radiation oncologist, who immediately set up specific radiation therapy appointments.

The radiation oncologist explained the malignant cells near my left eye would eventually cause me to go blind in that eye and that the accumulation of the malignant plasma cells in the sacrum could be the culprit of the leg and sciatic pain as well as the edema accumulation.

Image guided radiation treatment would consist of a couple of appointments for measurements and then 10 days of consecutive radiation. The eye lesion and the sacral lesions would be treated concurrently. The entire process began on 3/23/22. But the actual radiation treatments didn’t begin until 4/4/22 and ended on 4/15/22.

However, by Monday, 4/11/22, the pain in my legs was gone! That was awesome!

 

Vascular Surgeon: 3/24/22

On 3/24/22, I was examined by the vascular surgeon, who scheduled a full vascular study of my legs. She showed me some photos of her patients who had SARS-CoV-2 virus and had serious visible lesions in their legs because the spike protein caused endothelial damage in the venous system. She suggested that my leg edema might be the result of long haulers COVID, which I believe was provoked by the Darzalex side effects and eventually caused my multiple myeloma to reactivate. My hope is that after the radiation treatment, the water retention will go down, and I will return to my “normal self” before all of this started in July 2021.

The full vascular study consisted of doppler evaluation of both of my legs. The results showed healthy arterial flow but compromised venous flow. To be proactive, I had an echocardiogram on 4/14/22 to assure my heart was not the culprit of the leg edema – and it was not.

Although the leg pain as of 4/11/22 had ended, I am still waiting for the water retention to go down. No doubt it will in time!

 

Oncology Visit on 4/8/22

I visited my oncologist on 4/8/22 for new blood work and exam. He discussed the results of the ongoing radiation treatment and the report from the vascular surgeon. It could take another month to determine the benefits of the isolated guided radiation treatment on the concentrated accumulation of the malignant cells. Most likely, I’ll have another PET Scan. I am optimistic about the outcome.

Then I discussed with him my new protocol, which I planned to start on 4/16/22. I was pleasantly surprised that he agreed with me and gave me his ‘Go Ahead”. He emphasized that he would not recommend this to any of his other cancer patients because of medical legal obstacles. But he will continue to monitor me every 4 weeks to determine its effects.

 

My Newest Protocol – Fenbendazole  

Caveat: Once again, I am describing my experiment of N=1. I am not recommending this as treatment for any disease or for anyone to try. And I don’t know if it will work for me or not.

That being said, I’m not jumping into this without doing my own research. I knew about this drug for a couple of years but didn’t consider it seriously at that time because it was a “drug”. However, with the resurgence of malignant plasma cells in isolated areas of my body, I have changed my mind to give it a try.

The drug is Fenbendazole. It is a dog dewormer. Yes, a dog dewormer!

Joe Tippens popularized this out-of-the-box protocol when he wrote about his own cancer journey that began in 2016. He set up a website to explain his story and current research.

Joe was told that there was nothing oncology or modern medicine could do for his incurable lung cancer. His doctors gave him only 3 months to live. Yet, after his veterinarian friend suggested that he try fenbendazole, Joe began his own experiment of N=1. Fenbendazole “cured” his lung cancer!

Here is a video interview of Joe Tippens in 2021, where he describes his amazing story:

 

 

My Research

During my research, I found 47 studies when I searched PubMed describing the effects of this drug on human cancers. I also used Fenbendazole.org as a source for valuable information. In addition, there are two private Facebook groups for discussions about fenbendazole:

Unfortunately, I have not been able to find any research about this drug’s effects on multiple myeloma. So, as I said, I don’t know if it will help me or not.

Fenbendazole is a broad spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic originally used against gastrointestinal parasites in animals. Merck began experimenting with fenbendazole for animal use in 1961. It was used to treat rodent pinworm infections in dogs. But now it is fast becoming a repurposed drug to treat late-stage cancers in humans. Yet, fenbendazole is not FDA approved for human usage.

Fenbendazole is a dry, tasteless powder. Research shows it to significantly inhibit tumor growth when supplemented with vitamins A, D, E, K, and B. Incidentally, my animal-based diet adequately provides these essential vitamins in bioavailable forms. So, I will not take any synthetic or processed vitamin supplemental forms with fenbendazole.

Fenbendazole appears to kill cancer cells in three specific ways:

  • It destroys microtubules that sustain the structure of the cancer cell and its ability to divide and multiply rapidly.
  • It interrupts the cancer cells’ ability to process sugar to survive.
  • It boosts the production of a cancer-killing gene called p53, a gene that cancer patients may lack. When p53 becomes mutated or can’t keep cancer cells in check, cancer cells can proliferate.

Fenbendazole also works against parasites, which might be the origin of some cancers.

 

Side Effects

Some research suggests that those who are weak from chemotherapy may experience more side effects than those not receiving conventional cancer treatment. Some common side effects include elevated liver enzymes, mild diarrhea, and mild stomach discomfort. There has been a medical report that fenbendazole caused liver damage in a lung cancer patient, but the liver healed after the patient discontinued fenbendazole.

One concern I have that has not been reported to my knowledge is the potential damage to the gut microbiome. Another antiparasitic drug, Ivermectin, has been described to damage the gut microbiome causing gut dysbiosis. So, it could be possible that fenbendazole will also cause gut dysbiosis if not mitigated by proper gut support. And gut dysbiosis is a major source of most chronic diseases.

To that end, the methods I use to improve the diversity of a healthy gut microbiome and heal any damage resulting in a leaky gut are described in my 11 Unconventional Cancer Protocols.

For example, I consume Molecular Hydrogen as a discriminate free-radical neutralizer and antioxidant as well as Bovine Colostrum, both of which improve gut health. I also consume spore-based probiotics to assist in replenishing and diversifying my gut microbiome.

While including fenbendazole in my protocols, I am not following the Joe Tippens Protocol because it includes manmade supplements. As I have said, my eating lifestyle and original cancer protocols provide the necessary elements in bioavailable forms to help my body in its healing process.

 

My Protocol for Fenbendazole

On April 16, 2022, I began taking Fenbendazole 222 mg (Panacur C) for 3 days, then taking 4 days off every week. This product is supplied in individual packets, each containing the proper dosage. I mix the powder from one packet in my Colostrum in the morning. Fenbendazole should be taken with or after a meal containing fat for better absorption.

I’ll follow this weekly protocol until I see an improvement in my PET Scan as well as in the SPEP (serum protein electrophoresis) with immunofixation blood tests. These blood tests identify dysfunctional antibodies resulting from multiple myeloma. If there is no improvement in my monthly blood work, I will increase the frequency of my dosing of fenbendazole to every day without interruption. If there are signs that fenbendazole is harmful in any way, I will stop the experiment.

All along my experiment with fenbendazole, my oncologist will be witness to the effects – good or bad. As I have mentioned, I have new blood work every 4 weeks.

Time will tell, but I am encouraged.

I know that my previous protocols have helped my body reboot and enhance my immune system. And now, this additional protocol should further my healing ability. My current 11 Unconventional Cancer Protocols might be able to take my body’s ability to fight this multiple myeloma battle to a higher level than before.

While it’s been an extremely challenging 10 months, I’m not letting it hold me back. I’ve been working on a brand-new book that I can’t wait to share with you. And I really enjoy working one-on-one with my coaching clients and writing these weekly blogs. If you have any questions you’d like to see covered in an upcoming blog, send them my way!

 

Schedule a ”30-Minute Free Consult” with me to answer some of your questions and determine if we are a good fit for a coaching program! CLICK HERE.

 

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13 Comments

  1. Thank you so much for sharing your current situation. You are, as always, an inspiration to me! I love your willingness to try new things in an N=1 experiment and share your outcomes with us. You continue to be in my thoughts and prayers! Your wife is always in my prayers, too. I know she is such a major support to you. This world is so much better because you are in it.

  2. Eager to see if you benefit from this. I listened to podcast GI Dr on FLCCC a few weeks ago. She said ivermectin increases bifido bacteria in gut among many other health benefits!

  3. Are you familiar with Dr. Natasha Campbell McBride’s GAPS, Gut and Psychology/ Physiology Syndrome protocol? Perhaps you should consider adding plenty of probiotic foods to your diet, especially homemade kefir and raw sauerkraut. If you don’t do this already, then start with small amounts, to avoid harmful die-off, maybe daily 1 tablespoon or even 1 teaspoon. You may also consider putting a little kefir in an enema. Overtime maybe this can help re-populate your body with benevolent microbes as you pursue your deworming protocol. Indeed your body’s ecosystem is struggling, but you are putting up a good fight.

    • JD: Thank you, and I am familiar with Dr. Natasha’s work. I have an intense program to improve my gut health and diversity that I describe in my “11 Unconventional Cancer Protocols”. This has allowed me to create significant Alpha Diversity in my gut. Currently, I am in the 97th percentile in gut alpha diversity.

      • I’m an RN. I’ve heard great things about Panacur also. I have non Hodgkin’s lymphoma and was using Rituxan last year. It was hurting my joints so I’m doing the Kelley/Gonzalez protocol and feeling good. I will get rescanned in June but I’m happy with how I’m feeling. I also did two courses of Ivermectin because i do believe the logic about the parasitic basis of cancer (Hulda Clark’s book) . I’m also trying a baby ASA a day because of it’s powerful anti inflammatory properties. Best of luck to you!

  4. Your courage and ability to remain positive through all of this is inspiring for many of us, Dr. Al. Thanks for sharing.

  5. You are probably already aware of this, but some people with MM have had some success using IP6/Inositol. IP6 is available without a prescription, it is a supplement made from rice bran, so very safe. I have been taking a small amount of IP6/Inositol daily for a few years as a cancer-preventative, with no side effects. IP6 also chelates metals, including iron, and most cancers apparently require free iron to multiply.

  6. Good luck doctor. I am very hopeful for you and thankful for your courage to break new ground in cancer treatment. You are a true pioneer!!

  7. I always reading your posts as soon as they come out and am really grateful you share so much detail of your journey.
    This is fascinating about the fenbendazole. It’s use is similar to the path Care Oncology takes in working with old but useful drugs as off label adjuvants in cancer treatment. I’m sure you’ve looked at their work but if not please do.
    And Jane McLelland’s book “How to Starve Cancer” (much of which you already do with your diet).

  8. Your courage and determination to beat this thing is so inspiring Dr. Al! Thank you for sharing the details of your journey and protocol as this information will help SO many others suffering a similar cancer battle! My thoughts and prayers are with you and your wife too. Can’t wait for your new book to be released!!

  9. Dr. Al, Are you familiar with RGCC Labs in Greece/Switzerland? If you send them a sample of your blood they can perform a test called Onconomics Plus that will test a multitude of natural substances and drugs against your own cancer cells. The test will be able to tell you if the substance kills your cancer cells and to what degree.

  10. just wondering why you haven’t tried artemisia annuae, or sweet wormwood, which has shown very promising anti cancer effects. From what I have research the best form is an extract of the whole herb, not necessarily the active ingredient artemisin or artensunate.


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