I was Interviewed for
Wise Traditions Podcast

Dr. Al Danenberg Nutritional Periodontist
May 28, 2018

 

 

 

Podcasts are an amazing vehicle to get a message to the listening public. I really enjoy the opportunity to voice my passion about what means a lot to me. Recently, I was interviewed by Hilda Labrada Gore for the Wise Traditions Podcast that aired May 28, 2018.

 

This Podcast Series, which launched in January 2016, is part of the Weston A. Price Foundation. Wise Traditions Podcast Series now has over 900,000 downloads. Interviews of guests are published weekly and consist of a 30-minute discussion relating to fields of health, food, and farming.

 

The Weston A. Price Foundation is an important organization. It is a nonprofit, tax-exempt charity founded in 1999. Its goal is to disseminate the research of Dr. Weston A. Price, a dentist who was the chairman of the National Dental Association from 1914 to 1928. Dr. Price studied isolated non-industrialized peoples. He established parameters of human health and determined optimum characteristics of human diets. His research demonstrated that humans achieve health when they consume nutrient-dense whole foods and the vital fat-soluble “activators” found in animal fats.

 

I had fun doing this interview. Take 33 minutes of your time and listen to me and my interviewer, Hilda Labrada Gore, as I describe my views for gut health and dental health including my 5 tweaks for overall health.

 

 

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Crazy-Good Living

HIIT:
A New, Unique Protocol

Alvin H. Danenberg, DDS Nutritional Periodontist
August 14, 2017

 

 

In May 2017, I published my article titled, Connecting The Dots: HIIT, Mitochondria, Gingivitis. I explained how science has demonstrated a positive link between high intensity interval training (HIIT) and overall health. Specifically, I described the link between HIIT and the health of the mitochondria relating to improved mouth health.

 

In my new book, Crazy-Good Living, I discuss my Four Pillars of Health. One of those essentials for overall health including mouth health is efficient exercise. Exercise is not just one “event”, and that’s it. It is a combination of activities performed regularly. Efficient exercise consists of a combination of (1) simple movement like walking daily; (2) aerobic activity like playing tennis or jogging a few times a week; (3) full-body weight training like squats, pushups, pull ups, and planks twice a week; and (4) a short but intensive anaerobic activity like high intensity interval training once every 7-10 days.

 

HIIT

There are many methods to perform high intensity interval training. In my book, I describe how I use a NordicTrack Cross Country Skier for 4-6 cycles. One cycle equals intense, all-out “skiing” for 25 seconds followed by a 90 second rest period. However, there are many other methods to accomplish what I accomplish with this routine.

 

Here is a new idea.

 

I get my knowledge from a lot of people. There are so many great minds out there, so I don’t have to try to reinvent the wheel. One of those great minds is Dr. Joseph Mercola, who also taps other great minds. Dr. Mercola has the ability to summarize and simplify. He has perfected a HIIT routine that requires no equipment and can be performed anywhere at anytime. It is based on research from Dr. Zach Bush, a medical doctor and researcher. Joe calls his routine the Nitric Oxide Dump.

 

Nitric Oxide Dump

The name comes from the fact that high intensity interval training increases the creation of nitric oxide. HIIT stimulates the release of nitric oxide (NO) stored in the endothelial cells of blood vessels. NO effectively:

  • Causes blood vessels to relax and dilate, lowering blood pressure
  • Stimulates and improves immune function
  • Decreases the viscosity of blood, reducing platelet aggregation and the potential for stroke or heart attack
  • Provides anabolic stimulus to increases lean body mass
  • Improves the health of gingival tissues

 

Here is Dr. Mercola’s video demonstrating his simple routine:

 

This effective and quick routine has not been tested to equal the benefits of HIIT sprinting. However, I have tried it, and it is great. I don’t do this 2-3 times a day as Dr. Mercola recommends, but I include it several times a week. I continue to do my Nordic Track routine every 7-10 days. You may want to experiment with this efficient method. Let me know what you think.

 

 

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Crazy-Good Living

My Primal Lifestyle
Part 2 of 3: How I Exercise

      Alvin H. Danenberg, DDS     Nutritional Periodontist
      August 23, 2016  


 
 
     

My Primal Lifestyle
In Part 1, I discussed what I eat on a typical weekday and then what I eat on a typical weekend. In this Part, I discuss how I exercise. In Part 3, I discuss my sleep patterns and how I deal with stress.

 

 

 

My Philosophy

 

I believe an exercise program must be efficient for me. An efficient exercise program provides the maximum health and fitness benefits I am looking for in the least amount of time. I don’t want to produce oxidative stress in my body on a chronic basis. Therefore, I want a program that allows my body to rest and recover before performing another similar exercise session.

 

To meet these desires, I follow specific guidelines weekly. I perform high-intensity interval training, bodyweight strength training, aerobic exercise, and low-intensity physical activity.

 

 

High-intensity interval training

 

I use a Nordic Track Classic Pro Skier®, a cross-country ski machine that is set up in my spare bedroom.* Once a week, I do four to six cycles depending how I feel that day. It goes like this:

 

I warm up by “skiing” at a slow pace for two minutes. Then, I “ski” at the fastest speed I can muster for twenty-five seconds, and then rest by “skiing” slowly for ninety seconds. That completes one cycle, which I will repeat until done. This routine is exhausting, as it should be.

 

 

Bodyweight strength training

 

I do four basic movements in the privacy and comfort of my home once or twice a week. They are pull-ups, squats, pushups, and planks. I only use my own bodyweight as resistance. I purchased a pull-up bar online and attached it to the doorframe of my bedroom. Here is an online source that reviews various pull up bars.* The squats, pushups, and planks require no equipment, only motivation. There are great videos demonstrating these movements on YouTube by Mark Sisson. The series is worth viewing: pull-ups, squats, pushups, and planks.

 

 

Aerobic exercise

 

My favorite aerobic exercise is to ride my Trikke® outdoors.* For me, it’s great exercise and great fun. I ride my Trikke for thirty-to-forty minutes on Saturday and Sunday mornings, unless the weather is not cooperative.

 

 

Low-intensity physical activity

 

Non-exercise movement is just walking or moving about. My goal is to walk approximately 10,000 steps a day. At first, I found a pedometer was best to count how many steps I was taking a day. Today’s pedometers can be carried in your pocket, worn around your waist or wrist, or even worn around your neck. Here is an online review of various pedometers.* Once I learned how much walking I needed to do to add up to 10,000 steps, I didn’t need to use a pedometer any longer.

 

Standing rather than sitting has been shown to be important for overall health and for the health of your joints and stabilizing muscles. Sitting most of the day is associated with increased health risk, independent of the performance of other active exercise.

 

As a dentist, I sit while treating patients in my dental office. Standing while treating patients is practically impossible for me. While not treating patients, I try to stand as much as possible in my office. At home, I use a standup desk when I use my computer, and I stand while doing most anything I once did sitting.

 

 

 

Where I Am Today

 

I am almost 70 years old. These four categories make up my entire exercise program. Some experts have suggested that I could be more aggressive or varied in my routine. Personally, I don’t know why. This program has allowed me to feel healthier today than I have ever felt. I plan to continue what I am currently doing for as long as I am able. This is a simple program that works for me and allows me to do whatever else I want to do.

 

*(I do not receive any remuneration from Nordic Track, any pull up bar or pedometer company, or Trikke.)

 

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6 Things To Do for Health & Longevity

     Alvin H. Danenberg, DDS          September 27, 2015

 

evolution rHealth and longevity cannot be reduced to only 6 things to do – or can they?

 

Actually, research has demonstrated that the following six actions can and will lead to a healthier you and will improve the quality of your years going forward. My personal goal is to live a quality life with no degenerative, chronic diseases, and then just go quietly in the night with no fuss.

 

Each of these six endeavors should become your personal goals:

 

 

1. Eat nutrient-dense foods and get rid of the junk.

 

In this paper published in July 2015, nutrient-dense foods were shown to be beneficial for health and longevity. (Here)

 

You know my position on a Paleo-type (or anti-inflammatory) diet. It is a nutrient-dense way of eating. Peer-reviewed papers have proven not only the ability of a Paleo-type way of eating to improve health but also to be satiating. (Here)  There are many variations of a Paleo-type diet, but all agree – remove junk foods entirely and emphasize nutrient-dense foods.

 

The junk foods include:

  • Sugars that are added to any food
  • Grains
  • All processed foods
  • Liquid oils that are primarily Omega-6 fatty acids (such as soybean oil, canola oil, corn oil)

 

The nutrient-dense foods include:

  • Pastured and wild caught animal products from nose to tail with all their healthy fats
  • Non-starchy vegetables
  • Starchy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fruits in moderation

 

 

2. Understand hunger from within

 

Eat when you are hungry. Humans do not need to eat 3 meals a day with in-between snacks. On the contrary, our bodies perform better when there are episodes of fasting. Intermittent fasting has been reported to improve health and longevity. (Here, Here)

 

When you are eating a meal, think about each forkful of food you put into your mouth. Are you still hungry? If not, then stop eating. Your goal is to eat until you are satisfied and the hunger is no longer present. Your goal is not to eat until you are stuffed or until every morsel of food on your plate has been consumed.

 

 

3. Exercise efficiently

 

Exercise stimulates healthy bodily chemistries. Research has shown that the most efficient exercise is in the form of high intensity interval training. (Here, Here, Here). But also, research has shown that non-exercise movement like walking is critical for health. The phenomenon is called NEAT (Non Exercise Activity Thermogenesis). (Here, Here, Here). As a matter of fact, other forms of intense exercise will not replace the importance of daily non-exercise activities.

 

 

4. Reduce stress

 

Your body is designed to deal with acute, intermittent stress. It is not designed to deal with chronic, unrelenting stress. (Here).

 

Stress takes the form of chemical insults like environmental toxins, physical insults like over exercise or an accident, psychological insults like abusive relationships or worry. Chronic stress breaks down the gut, leads to systemic inflammation, and damages organ systems. (Here). Stress also affects the mouth. (Here).

 

 

5. Sleep restoratively

 

You body rebuilds and reenergizes itself while asleep. (Here)  The human body was designed to respond to a circadian rhythm. When the sun sets, your body is ready to sleep; when the sun rises, your body is ready to awaken. Most adults benefit from at least 7-8 hours of sleep commencing between 9-11 PM. The ideal sleeping environment should be a dark and cool room.

 

 

6. Get sun

 

Sun stimulates the skin to produce Vitamin D3 from cholesterol in your skin. (Here)  Vitamin D is critical for every cell in the body to function properly. Most of us require 5-15 minutes a day of sun exposure, 2-3 days a week without sunscreen and with 70-80% of the body exposed to the vital UVB rays.

 

 

My Final Thoughts

 

There you have them – six things to do for health and longevity. The science is there, but the science will not make you healthier.  Only your motivation to implement the science into personal actions will improve your health and extend your longevity.

Here is How I Exercise

Alvin H. Danenberg, DDS Nutritional Periodontist
April 13, 2015

 

 

evolution rSometime ago I wrote about the 4 pillars of health. I compared them to the legs of a dining room chair. Those pillars are:

  • Nutrient-dense foods
  • Stress reduction
  • Restorative sleep
  • Efficient exercise

 

If any one of these pillars is compromised, then overall health would be in danger – just as if one leg of the chair were broken, the chair would be unstable. What happens on a cellular level eventually affects your entire body. Your mouth is intimately and intricately affected by your overall health.

 

There is significant research that shows (1) how specific methods of exercise are extremely effective in creating the healthiest results and (2) how these benefits might be obtained in the shortest amount of exercise-time.

 

Here is the way I exercise on a weekly basis to get the most from my workout. For your information, I am 68 years old. Based on your physical well-being, you might choose other exercise programs that would be better suited for you.

 

Brief and Intense Strength Training:

Strength training builds muscle strength and improves hormone efficiency that allows your body to function optimally. I do four simple movements that take as little as 10-20 minutes a couple of times a week to gain maximum benefit. These basic movements are: pull-ups, pushups, squats, and planks.

 

I do these four movements twice a week in the privacy and comfort of my home. The only equipment that is necessary is a pull-up bar. I purchased one online and attached it to the doorframe of my bedroom. Here is a source that reviews various doorframe pull-up bars. You also could look up “portable free-standing pull up bars” online to view various manufacturers and models, which could be set up anywhere.

 

Mark Sisson has created four YouTube videos that demonstrate these movements in a progressive manner from beginner to advanced. Here are links to them:

Pull-up. Pushup. Squats. Plank.

 

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT):

HIIT is the ultimate beneficial exercise for your heart, your muscles, your hormones, and your weight. You could perform this once a week for 10-20 minutes in total. You would start with a warm up of 1-2 minutes. Each cycle might consist of (1) 7-30 seconds of all-out-to-exhaustion pedaling on a recumbent bike or sprinting outside, and (2) rest for about 90 seconds to regain your normal breath. This cycle should be repeated for 2-8 cycles. Then, finish with a 1-2 minute cool down.

 

I use a Nordic Track Classic Pro Skier. It is a cross-country ski machine that is set up in my spare bedroom. Usually I use it once a week for 4-6 cycles depending how I feel that day. I warm up by skiing at a slow pace for 2 minutes. Then, I “ski” at the fastest speed my arms and legs can muster for 25 seconds, which puts me out-of-breath and in an anaerobic state.  Then I rest by skiing gently for 90 seconds. That completes one cycle, which I will repeat until done.

 

Dr. Mercola has created a video that demonstrates HIIT using a recumbent bike.

 

Aerobic Exercise

My goal is to exercise about two hours a week doing exercise that will raise my heart rate between 55% to 75% of my maximum heart rate. At that level of effort, I can carry on a conversation while exercising. If I were unable to carry on a conversation, I probably would be in the anaerobic zone of exercising, and that is not where I want to be for this routine. My personal aerobic exercise is riding my Trikke outdoors. It’s great exercise and great fun for me. I try to ride my Trikke (model T78 Deluxe) about 2 or 3 times a week for about 40 minutes. I find the best time of day is just after the sun rises – peaceful and beautiful.

 

 

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Crazy-Good Living

Healthier Mouth … Healthier Lifestyle … Healthier You
Part 5 of 5

evolution rApproximately 80% of your body’s composition is based on the foods that you consume. In the last posts, I have suggested the ones that should be eliminated, the ones that should be included, and some possible supplements that have merit. Here is the rest of the story and more…
 
Physical Activity:
 
Aerobic Exercise for about 2 hours a week helps burn fat and stabilize hormones. These exercises should be performed at 55% to 75% of your estimated maximum heart rate, which is determined by this formula: 208 – (age x 0.7). As an example, if you were 50 years old, then your maximum heart rate would be (208 – 35) = 173. Your aerobic routine should be performed between a heart rate of 95 (i.e. 55% of 173) beats per minute and 130 (i.e. 75% of 173) beats per minute. If you go below 95, there will be no exercise benefit; if you go above 130, the exercise becomes anaerobic – not what you want to do. Adequate rest between exercises is critical for healthy results.
 
Brief and Intense Strength Training builds muscle strength and improves hormone efficiency that allow your body to function optimally and speed metabolism. Science has shown that doing four simple movements taking as little as 10-20 minutes twice a week can get your body in shape. These movements are squats, pull-ups, pushups, and planks.
 
High Intensity Interval Training is the ultimate beneficial exercise for your heart, your muscles, your hormones, and your weight. You could perform this once a week for 10-20 minutes in total. You would start with a warm up of 1-2 minutes. Each cycle might consist of (1) 7-30 seconds of all-out-to-exhaustion pedaling on a recumbent bike, and (2) rest for about 90 seconds to regain your normal breath. This cycle should be repeated for 2-8 cycles. Then, finish with a 1-2 minute cool down.
 
Non-Exercise Movement is just walking or moving about. Your goal should be to take approximately 10,000 steps per day. A pedometer is best to register these steps. Today, pedometers can be carried in your pocket, worn around your waist or wrist, or even worn around your neck.
 
Standing rather than Sitting has recently been shown to be important for overall health, and the health of your joints and stabilizing muscles. It has been postulated that sitting most of the day may be as unhealthy as smoking.
 
Restorative Sleep is not actually physical activity but rather physical inactivity. Sleep is critical to maintain normal hormonal repair in your body. But restorative sleep is not haphazard; it should be based on the natural circadian rhythm that is a result of the sun rising and setting at different times in the year. On average, it is best to get at least 7-8 hours of sleep each night starting from the hours of 9-11 PM in a dark, cool setting.
 
Total Stress Load is physically demanding and must be reduced. Stress can build internally from physical causes, emotional causes, and chemical causes. All these will accumulate over time and become detrimental to your overall health. Physical causes could be the result of over-exercising. Emotional stresses could be the result of how you deal with life itself. Chemical stresses could be the result of toxins in foods, bacterial infections, and environmental toxins. Environmental toxins are abundant like aluminum in antiperspirants, heavy metals in water and other foods, and insecticides inside and outside of your home.
 
I am living proof that you certainly can teach an old dog new tricks! I only began these changes for myself in 2013 when I was 67 years old. I have personally improved my life and my health by making these lifestyle changes. It is never too late to start.
 
NOTE:
I DO NOT RECEIVE ANY COMPENSATION FROM ANY OF THE COMPANIES I HAVE RECOMMENDED.