My 10 Solutions
– We Swim in a Polluted Sea: Part 2 –

Dr. Al Danenberg Nutritional Periodontist

May 16, 2021

 

 

In Part 1 last week, I used the metaphor that we swim in a polluted sea. I suggested that our environment is killing us slowly. The sea could seal the fate of those who refuse to be proactive and reactive.

The bright light is that there are solutions. And they are simple. But their implementation is complex.

My 10 Solutions

Ideally, the residents of the polluted sea need to swim out of their environment and into fresh, clean water. Individuals need to give their body what it requires and remove everything that is damaging. Those who want to regain and maintain health must choose a different sea in which to swim.

A metaphorically healthy sea would consist of all the nutrients and lifestyle choices that support your body and would avoid potentially toxic substances and irritants that could hinder your health. This new environment would improve the responsiveness of your immune system and create metabolic flexibility.

Here is my vision of an unpolluted sea. It consists of my 10 solutions. Some may be more important than others. But in my opinion, they work in synergy. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts:

  1. Nutrient-dense, anti-inflammatory foods
  2. Natural spring water
  3. A robust gut
  4. Strong cells with functional mitochondria
  5. Healthy sun exposure
  6. Restorative sleep
  7. Efficient exercise
  8. Stress reduction
  9. Effective oral hygiene
  10. Consciousness of the mind, body, spirit connection

Let’s get started.

#1: Foods

All healthy diets exclude:

  • Added sugars and excess carbs
  • Agrochemicals
  • Emulsifiers, preservatives, dyes, and other chemicals
  • Over-processed seed and vegetable oils
  • Trans fats, hydrogenated & partially hydrogenated fats
  • Anti-nutrients in specific plants that will harm the gut microbiome and the gut lining

I have created my Better Belly Blueprint that embraces an eating lifestyle of at least 70% animal-based foods and less than 30% of selected plants with minimal anti-nutrients (i.e. phytates, lectins, and oxalates).

Animals must be pastured, fed no chemicals, and raised humanely. Eat from nose-to-tail, which includes their muscle meat, saturated fats, organs, and collagenous parts. Practically all the nutrients your body requires are in nose-to-tail eating.

If you would like to see some of my original recipes, click on Better Belly Blueprint Recipes.

#2: Water

Probably this is one of the most underrated yet essential nutrients for our body. I wrote about water in my article on Hydration & BUN. And one of the best sources of pure water is the natural and unfiltered spring waters that are replete with trace minerals and the energy the sun bestows on the chemical and electrical properties of water. They should be bottled in glass.

#3: Gut

Much medical research today is uncovering the immense importance of our gut for overall health and wellness. We must …

  • Maintain an intact gut lining
  • Improve the integrity of the mucous layer
  • Establish a high diversity, quantity, and quality of individual species of beneficial bacteria

One method to improve the gut microbiome is to ingest spore-based probiotics. Studies show that these unique bacteria are resistant to stomach acid, germinate in the gut, produce beneficial chemicals (metabolites), enhance the growth of other commensal bacteria, and assist in the repair of the gut epithelial barrier.

In addition, specific immunoglobulins, which can be introduced into the gut, will bind to toxic elements and hasten repair of the mucous layer and gut epithelial lining.

I published a mini-eBook explaining the interactions of the gut with chronic disease. In my publication, Is Your Gut Killing You?,  I cite 295 peer-reviewed medical articles.

#4: Strong Cells with Functional Mitochondria

So far, a healthy diet, unfiltered natural spring water, and a robust gut will provide the elements for efficient and effective cells. But there is another force that can improve the cell membranes and the production of ATP. It is based on the magnetic field of the Earth.

The Earth’s magnetic field ranges from 26 to 66 micro-Tesla.[1] Tesla is the measurement of the strength or intensity of a magnetic field and incorporates the amplitude of the wave frequencies.

The wave frequencies on Earth “speak” to all cells of the body – restoring proper electrical balance, healthy cell membranes, blood circulation and oxygenation, and mitochondrial function. Walking on natural ground with bare feet (i.e., grounding) helps transmit this energy into your body.

If there were no Earth’s magnetic field, various illnesses would occur.[2] For example, beyond the Earth’s atmosphere there is a significant reduction in electromagnetic forces. NASA learned early that there was biological harm to their astronauts from the loss of the Earth’s magnetic field in outer space. To compensate for the medical damage that was done, NASA began to equip their space capsules and space suits with electromagnetic field generators to simulate the natural magnetic fields on Earth. These generators produced an average of 50 micro-Tesla.

Another way for you to improve cellular function would be to use Pulsed Electromagnetic Field (PEMF) Therapy with a full body mat. This is what I do to assist with healthy cellular membranes and mitochondria.

My mat specifically runs at a maximum of 40 micro-Tesla with filters to remove any voltage spikes or damaging electromagnetic fields.[3] This German-made mat produces frequencies from 0.1 – 10,000 Hz in harmonic wave patterns. I incorporate a specific PEMF protocol three times a day, which I describe in my Unconventional Cancer Protocols.

#5: Healthy Sun Exposure

Our main source of Vitamin D is the Vitamin D3 that is created in the skin from exposure to sunlight. We also get some Vitamin D2 from a few foods in our diet. When we have inadequate blood levels of Vitamin D, we can improve them through dietary supplements. But for Vitamin D to function properly, it requires various “helper” nutrients, which include Vitamin K2, Vitamin A, magnesium, boron, and zinc.

Vitamin D3 and Vitamin D2 enter the circulation and eventually are converted into “25 Hydroxy Vitamin D” (the inactive form of Vitamin D) by the liver. This is basically our “storage pile” of Vitamin D. This inactive form returns to the circulation and reaches the kidneys where it is transformed into “1,25 Dihydroxy Vitamin D” (the active form) as it is needed.

The active form of Vitamin D acts on bones, the intestine, and kidneys to regulate the level of calcium and phosphorus in our blood.

It also has many other functions in the human body. Vitamin D regulates cell differentiation, cell maturation and the innate immune system. It affects up to 10% of our genetic activity and improves the resistance against certain diseases including cancer.[4]

Another benefit is that it enhances the diversity of microbes in the gut as well as increases the variety of beneficial species.[5]

Your blood level goal for 25 Hydroxy Vitamin D should be no less than 40-60 ng/ml. Toxicity usually does not occur until the blood level is above 125 ng/ml.

#6: Restorative Sleep

Your body relies on circadian rhythms. These are physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour cycle. They are natural processes that respond primarily to light and dark.

The cycle of circadian rhythms regulates the biological clocks that are the natural timing devices for many of our body’s functions such as:

  • Hormone release
  • Eating habits and digestion
  • Body temperature
  • Sleep patterns

Most people can optimize their circadian rhythms by sleeping about 7-8 hours a night. The ideal time to go to bed is between the hours of 9 PM to 11 PM. Also, make the room dark, cool, and quiet for a better night’s sleep.

#7: Efficient Exercise

Your body requires movement. This includes simple movements as well as complex movements. To “work” your body efficiently, you should include a combination of:

  • Brief, high-intensity interval training once every 7-10 days
  • Aerobic exercise 1-2 days a week
  • Strength training 1-2 days a week
  • Non-exercise movements every day 

#8: Stress Reduction

Meditate; practice yoga; try diaphragmatic breathing; and experiment with progressive, total body muscle relaxation.

Continuous emotional stress will damage the gut microbiome and cause “leaky gut”, which will lead to significant and ongoing chronic systemic inflammation. This will tax the immune system to the extent that the immune system will be compromised and unable to mount an aggressive attack when needed to destroy serious invading pathogens.

I published this article in November 2020 that shows the damage emotional stress can cause in an otherwise healthy mouth.

#9: Effective Oral Hygiene

Your gut bacteria and your mouth bacteria “talk” back and forth. Your gut must be healthy, and your mouth must be healthy. Infection and inflammation from the gut and mouth can enter the blood system, travel along nerve fibers, and infiltrate tissue fluids to contribute to chronic disease. If there are any irritants in your mouth, they must be treated appropriately.

To make sure your mouth stays healthy, you need to have a personal oral hygiene regimen.  This includes brushing your teeth at the gum margins, flossing and cleaning the surfaces between each of your teeth, and scraping the topside of your tongue to remove odor forming bacteria and microscopic food remnants. I’ve published a detailed PDF that explains the 4 Steps to a Healthy Mouth.

#10: Consciousness of the mind, body, spirit connection

We are more than just the food we eat, our individual cells, and our environment. We are our thoughts and emotions, our physical bodies, and our spirituality. No part of our body functions like an island unto itself. Our mind, body, and spirit are intertwined and determine our health, make us who we are, and guide us to our purpose in life.

Connect the Dots

I stated earlier that there are solutions.

Basically, they are simple and available to us if we take the time to gather them together.

But the implementation is complex. A proactive person must research and act upon the elements I just discussed. There is no magic pill; it takes dedication to swim out of the polluted sea into fresh, clean waters. But the ultimate outcome will be transformative and regenerative.

[1] http://www.geophys.ac.cn/infowin/cc.asp

[2] https://www.imrs.com/en/earth-s-magnetic-field.html

[3] https://www.purewavenow.com/pemf-portable-system

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2879391/

[5] https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-77806-4 

 

 

 

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4 Steps to a Healthy Mouth

Dr. Al Danenberg Nutritional Periodontist

August 23, 2020

4 Steps to a Healthy MouthWhen I was a kid going to the dentist, my dentist always told me I had to brush harder. What did that mean? When my family moved to another city, my new dentist told me totally different things about brushing my teeth. Wasn’t there a right way, and wasn’t there a wrong way? Then, when I went to dental school, each faculty member had his special technique that contradicted his peers. How confusing!

 

I’ve written about this before. But this is my update with new information.

 

 

Teeth & Dental Plaque are Unique

Here is a little-known fact. The only area of the body where a hard structure pierces the skin and enters into the sterile bony structures is the tooth. Think about this for a moment. Can you imagine the potential havoc that could occur if infection were to move down the tooth into the jawbone? But the body has a solution.

 

The tooth pierces the gum tissue and anchors itself in the jawbone. The body created a “healthy biofilm” to protect this susceptible area to prevent bacteria from sliding down the tooth into the bone. There are other protective structures under the gum that can alert the immune system to fight infections. But first, this protective and healthy biofilm is the initial defense. It is called dental plaque.[1],[2],[3],[4],[5],[6] It serves at least three main functions:

  • Allows necessary nutrients and minerals from the saliva to enter the root of the tooth to remineralize it as necessary 24/7.
  • Produces hydrogen peroxide to kill any potentially pathogenic microbes in the mouth from getting to the gum/tooth margin
  • Buffers the acidity around the gum/tooth margin to maintain an acid level of no more acidic than pH 5.5 to prevent demineralization of the root surface

 

So, dental plaque is healthy – until it’s not. What makes it unhealthy?

 

Unhealthy changes in the garden of friendly bacteria in the gut, systemic inflammation as a result of a “leaky gut”, poor diet, and a compromised immune system play critical roles in the development of unhealthy dental plaque. All these areas must be addressed in order to have a healthy mouth. But proper oral hygiene is also vital for overall health and wellness.

 

 

Oral Hygiene for Mouth Health

Unhealthy levels of bacteria in the dental plaque can create chemicals that can cause tooth demineralization, tooth decay, and gum inflammation. There have been numerous commercial toothpastes and cleaning devices developed along with many cleaning techniques to help remove this junk from around our teeth. Each claims superiority; what is an intelligent person to do?

 

Removing the amounts of unhealthy bacteria from around the tooth is the goal of flossing and brushing. The goal is not to remove healthy dental plaque. And the goal is not to kill all the bacteria in the mouth since much of the bacteria in the mouth is good bacteria. An effective method to clean unhealthy dental plaque is to use (1) something to clean between the teeth and (2) a good toothbrush to clean the other surfaces of the teeth. Also, (3) don’t forget your tongue! Do these methods first thing in the morning and last thing at night. And (4) there is a way to possibly make dental plaque healthier.

 

 

1. Clean Between Your Teeth

I floss between my teeth using dental floss. This can remove food that is stuck between the contacts of teeth. Think about sliding up and down a pole. That is how the floss wraps around the tooth and slides up and down to scrape away food particles and unhealthy dental plaque. However, flossing under the gum tissues could cut the gum.

 

Also, I always use a small brush that is designed to clean between teeth like a pipe cleaner (one brand is called TePe EasyPick®, another is GUM Soft Pick®). Imagine the small bristles of this tiny brush scrubbing away the overgrown unhealthy bacteria as it is pushed in and out between the teeth at the gum line. These small brushes are the best way to remove unhealthy plaque buildup at the base of the tooth and gum margin.

 

 

2. Brush Your Teeth

I like to use an electric toothbrush like the Sonicare® or the Oral B/Braun® because electric brushes are more efficient, and I am lazy. You don’t need to use any toothpaste to brush your teeth effectively. Just brush with filtered water. However, if you want “toothpaste”, wet the bristles of the toothbrush and dip the bristles in a little baking soda. Baking soda is slightly abrasive and will remove some superficial stains from the surface of the teeth. It also can neutralize excess acid in the area. You could keep a small jar of baking soda in the bathroom. Then brush your teeth GENTLY, angling the bristles into the space where the gums meet the teeth on both the cheek side and the tongue side of all teeth. Brush horizontally but GENTLY.

 

I rarely use a mouthwash, because daily use of an antimicrobial mouthwash will kill bad bacteria as well as good bacteria. Killing good bacteria daily will compromise the health in your mouth and the rest of your body.[7] But if you want to use a mouthwash on rare occasions, use about a teaspoon of coconut oil and swish it around for a few minutes. Then, spit it out (called Oil Pulling). If you use coconut oil as a mouthwash, be sure to spit it out into a napkin or paper towel and throw it in the trash. If you spit coconut oil into your sink, it could clog up the pipes!

 

 

3. Brush Your Tongue

Most of the odor-forming bacteria is located on the top and back areas of your tongue, closest to your throat. An effective way to remove overgrown bacteria and food remnants causing odor is to use a teaspoon. Place the inverted teaspoon as far back as is comfortable on the upper side of your tongue. Then, gently glide the teaspoon forward, removing the bacterial film and microscopic food particles. Repeat this 2-3 times, and then wash off the teaspoon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Consume Spore-Based Probiotics & Vitamin K2:

Spore-based probiotics will attach to healthy dental plaque and may improve the balance of bacteria in this biofilm. Also, vitamin K2 has been shown to improve the energy production of individual cells and improve the immune system, which are compromised in periodontal disease. Both may be significant in the health of the mouth and the health of the gut.[8],[9],[10]

 

So, here is a way to be proactive. During your dinner, take 2 capsules of Vitamin K2 (320 mcg). Then, after cleaning your mouth at bedtime:

  • Open 2 capsules of spore-based probiotics
  • Place their powders in a glass; throw away the empty capsules
  • Add 1-2 teaspoons of water to make a slurry
  • Swish this liquid in your mouth for a minute or so
  • Then, swallow

 

The probiotics will coat the dental plaque, and the liquid will disseminate in the gut quickly after swallowing. Vitamin K2 and spore-based probiotics are resistant to stomach acid and will enter the intestines. The spores will begin to germinate in the intestines creating healthy biochemicals. Both will enhance the immune system and support the growth, diversity, and quality of other friendly gut bacteria.[11],[12],[13],[14],[15],[16] (Send an email to me at Dr.Danenberg@iCloud.com, and I will send you ordering information about the spores and vitamin K2 that I personalize use.)

 

 

Some “No-Nos”

  • Don’t floss aggressively under the gum tissue. You easily could cut the gum and create a wound. That wound might stay sore and heal like a cleft. Aggressive flossing under the gum also could cause gum recession.
  • A water-pick device can be dangerous. It could force food debris and bacteria deeper under the gum tissues if used on a moderate-to-high pressure setting. Also, the force of the water jet could tear gum tissue cells that are trying to heal inside the gum space. If you wanted to use a water-pick device, make sure you use the lowest power settings and don’t angle the water jet under the gum tissues.
  • If you drink very acid drinks, the minerals of the tooth could become “softened” until the acid in the mouth returns to normal. I suggest that you don’t brush your teeth right after drinking any acid drink. Research suggests that you should wait at least an hour before brushing after drinking an acid drink.[17] It would be a good idea to rinse your mouth with water to help remove the excess acid while your mouth regains its normal acid level. It would be wiser not to drink highly acidic drinks in any form.

 

 

That’s it – great ways to remove unhealthy plaque and other harmful microbes from your mouth and support healthy dental plaque as well as a healthy gut.

 

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5126660/

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28476771

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4132376/

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5034904/

[5] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11039053/

[6] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2147593/

[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28353075

[8] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=10.1126%2Fscience.1218632

[9] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5953218/ 

[10] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5448046/

[11] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5561432/

[12] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32495964/

[13] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32664604/

[14] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7146158/

[15] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6683014/

[16] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5323449/

[17] https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1365-2818.2012.03630.x
 

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Can Gut Problems Cause Gum Problems?

      Alvin H. Danenberg, DDS     February 5, 2016  


 
 

Gut Problems and Gum ProblemsYes!

 

But, my next statement may be even more important: Bad things may be going on in your gut without causing obvious gut symptoms. Yet, those bad things still could be causing your gum problems.

 

Let me explain.

 

The tube that extends for about 30 feet from your mouth to your anus is called the digestive tract or gastrointestinal tract. Anything that goes on in any part of that tube may affect everything else in that tube. If you had unhealthy changes in your gut, they definitely could affect your mouth.

 

What could affect the gut?

 

The foods you eat could change the bacteria populations in your gut, which could damage your gut lining. Also, some foods could put holes in the lining of your gut. Then, undigested food particles and bacteria particles could leak from your gut into your blood system and cause various inflammatory reactions. All this could affect other areas in your body.

 

Changes in the bacteria in your gut and changes in the lining of your gut also could cause changes in the tissues in your mouth. You could develop ulcers in your mouth; you could have unhealthy increases of bad bacteria around your gums; you could develop serious damage in the bone that holds your teeth in place in your jaw. Gut issues could cause all these mouth issues. However, as I mentioned, you may not have obvious gut pain or other gut symptoms.

 

Are there tests that can suggest what is happening in the gut?

 

Some functional medicine tests could help determine if you are sensitive to specific foods that could be the culprits. Other tests could help determine if there is an abundance of bad bacteria or other microbes living in your gut. Additional tests could identify if your gut lining is damaged and causing leakage into your bloodstream. These tests might help your dentist or other practitioner get to the bottom of your mouth problems.

 

Although proper oral hygiene is very important to help your mouth stay healthy, there may be other causes. Not-so-obvious causes may start in your gut but later affect your mouth. Probably, up to this point, no one has addressed those possibilities.

 

If you suffer from these problems, a dentist that understands functional medicine might be able to help.

 

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What Did You Say I Have?

        Alvin H. Danenberg, DDS       November 8, 2015

 

evolution r“What did you say I have? I brush my teeth everyday and floss when I can. Now you say I have gum disease that is eating away at my jawbone! How did this happen to me?”

 

You are not alone!

 

A study published in 2010 demonstrated that 93.9% of adults in the United States had some form of gingivitis, which is inflammation of the gum tissues surrounding the teeth.

 

Another study published in 2012 by The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated that 47% of the US adult population has periodontitis (the advanced stage of gum disease that eats away at the jawbone). If you were over 65 years old, the prevalence of this advanced infection jumped to 70%. Wow!

 

Advanced gum disease typically does not hurt. The earlier stage of this disease, which is gingivitis, usually produces bleeding gums. But, if gingivitis progresses to the more advanced stage of periodontitis, the bleeding generally stops as the infection moves deeper under the gums to begin destroying the jawbone.

 

If left untreated, periodontitis will cause teeth to get loose. Teeth will become sore and painful to the touch. Chewing will become uncomfortable. Infection that is around the tooth root could be pushed into the blood system, affecting other areas of the body. These gum infections could also become severe in the mouth resulting in much swelling, bleeding, and odor. Once the structure of the jawbone is significantly destroyed, the only option would be to extract the teeth involved. In addition to mouth problems, gum disease has been associated with many other bodily conditions such as diabetes, pre-term and low-weight babies, heart disease, and many more.

 

There are many causes. The most common is bacteria that get under the gums around the teeth that thrive off of the sugars and refined carbohydrates we eat abundantly everyday. Another cause is the lack of efficient oral hygiene, which includes effective tooth and gum cleaning habits. Additional causes are the health of our digestive system, the nutrients that are in our foods, our stress level, and our genetic predisposition. Frequently, habits like gritting or grinding your teeth, even if you are not aware of this habit, could weaken the jawbone and result in further destruction.

 

You cannot change your genetics, but you can change the quality of foods you eat and your lifestyle, and you can learn to properly clean around your teeth and gums.

 

Those who read my blogs may know that I am a periodontist (gum specialist) with 41 years experience in treating patients with advanced gum disease. I also am licensed in the laser gum treatment called LANAP® (Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure), which is patient-friendly and involves no cutting with scalpels and no stitches. I have found this to be the best way to treat advanced gum disease. In addition, I am a Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner using this background to guide patients to a healthier diet and lifestyle. Some of my patients decide to complete a 3-Day Food Journal, which allows me to evaluate their eating and lifestyle habits and then to recommend healthier food and lifestyle choices.

 

I offer my patients a Lifestyle Repair Plan, in which I recommend an anti-inflammatory diet, selecting from a host of nutrient-dense foods. These are the foods that have a great deal of nutrients packed into each calorie. My Plan also incorporates changes in lifestyle that are critical for overall health. Included are concepts of health maintenance like Oral Care, Restorative Sleep, Efficient Exercise, and Stress Reduction – concepts that I have summarized into simple and doable steps.

 

My goal for my patients is to treat their active gum infections, teach them methods to maintain a healthy mouth, and assist them with eating and lifestyle changes that could lead not only to a healthier mouth for the rest of their lives but also to a healthier body.

What To Do About Your Gum Disease?

evolution rPeriodontitis is an advanced stage of gum disease that destroys the gum as well as the bone supporting the roots of teeth. It is the manifestation of a disease process where specific virulent bacteria are creating inflammation and byproducts that are destructive. These bacteria have gained dominance in the mouth because of various reasons.
 
One reason might be the unhealthy food choices that have affected the unhealthy gut bacteria to become overgrown and to affect the entire body. Another reason might be damage to the gut lining allowing undigested proteins to leak into the bloodstream causing chronic inflammation and autoimmune issues. Still another reason might be that necessary micronutrients that our individual cells require to maintain healthy function are lacking in the foods we eat. While all these might be contributing factors, there still is a virulent strain of bacteria in the mouth creating havoc. What can be done?
 
Technology today has significantly improved the comfort for the patient and the healing results. The LANAP® (Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure) protocol using the PerioLase® Laser effectively will destroy these harmful bacteria without harming healthy gum, tooth, or bone tissues. It also will assist the jawbone surrounding the teeth to repair and regenerate. There is no cutting with a scalpel and no sutures. Patients generally return to their normal routines the next day. You will find several research articles on LANAP here.
 
For long-term control and prevention, good oral hygiene and healthy food choices are critical. Eliminating the offending foods that started the problem in the first place will go a long way in preventing disease in the future. Eating the foods that can support the health of individual cells is just as important. As I have indicated in previous blogs, our primal ancestors hardly ever had gum disease. In addition, today’s hunter-gatherer societies around the world who have never consumed these modern-day processed foods are relatively free of gum disease as well as the types of chronic diseases plaguing most westernized societies.
 
Research has shown that xylitol, a sugar alcohol derived from the bark of birch trees, not only can help to prevent tooth decay but also may be able to turn off the biochemical processes that allow this virulent bacteria to cause destruction of the gum and bone tissues around the teeth. Using xylitol while brushing the teeth might help to calm down this disease process in the future. Some xylitol is manufactured from corn products. I recommend xylitol that is made from birch trees.
 
I completed a study in my offices with several of my patients that had active advanced gum disease to determine if specific nutrient-dense food supplements would improve their infection. The results have been positive, and you can read them here.
 
So, a good program that could eliminate advanced gum disease and prevent its return might include:
 
• Destroying the offending bacteria that are causing the disease and assisting the body in regeneration through the treatment of the LANAP protocol
 
• Eating a Paleolithic-type diet, which avoids the unhealthy foods and replaces them with healthy ones
 
• Performing good oral hygiene daily that might include the use of xylitol, and consuming specific nutrient-dense food supplements